Negative Emissions Technologies: Difference between revisions

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''This page is about the intersection of negative emissions technologies and machine learning in the context of climate change mitigation. For an overview of carbon dioxide removal as a whole, please see the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_dioxide_removal Wikipedia page] on this topic.''
 
Negative Emission Technologies (NETs), often referred to as Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), aim to artificially remove carbon dioxide (CO<sub>2</sub>) from the atmospere<ref>{{Cite journal|last=Minx|first=Jan C|last2=Lamb|first2=William F|last3=Callaghan|first3=Max W|last4=Fuss|first4=Sabine|last5=Hilaire|first5=Jérôme|last6=Creutzig|first6=Felix|last7=Amann|first7=Thorben|last8=Beringer|first8=Tim|last9=de Oliveira Garcia|first9=Wagner|last10=Hartmann|first10=Jens|last11=Khanna|first11=Tarun|date=2018-05-21|title=Negative emissions—Part 1: Research landscape and synthesis|url=https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aabf9b|journal=Environmental Research Letters|language=en|volume=13|issue=6|pages=063001|doi=10.1088/1748-9326/aabf9b|issn=1748-9326}}</ref>, in addition to the natural removal of the atmospheric CO<sub>2</sub> by the natural carbon sinks (such as land and ocean)<ref>IPCC, 2018: Annex I: Glossary [Matthews, J.B.R. (ed.)]. In: Global Warming of 1.5°C. An IPCC Special Report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty [Masson-Delmotte, V., P. Zhai, H.-O. Pörtner, D. Roberts, J. Skea, P.R. Shukla, A. Pirani, W. Moufouma-Okia, C. Péan, R. Pidcock, S. Connors, J.B.R. Matthews, Y. Chen, X. Zhou, M.I. Gomis, E. Lonnoy, T. Maycock, M. Tignor, and T. Waterfield (eds.)]. In Press</ref>. NETs are not a substitution for climate mitigation and reducing global emission rate, but can be used together with mitigation efforts to speed up the reduction of emissions and reaching the net-zero emission targets sooner, depending on the [[Emission scenarios|emission scenario]]. The mitigation pathways consistent with reaching the 1.5 °C target (reported by the IPCC Special Report on 1.5 Degrees<ref name=":3">Rogelj, J., D. Shindell, K. Jiang, S. Fifita, P. Forster, V. Ginzburg, C. Handa, H. Kheshgi, S. Kobayashi, E. Kriegler, L. Mundaca, R. Séférian, and M.V. Vilariño, 2018: Mitigation Pathways Compatible with 1.5°C in the Context of Sustainable Development. In: Global Warming of 1.5°C. An IPCC Special Report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty [Masson-Delmotte, V., P. Zhai, H.-O. Pörtner, D. Roberts, J. Skea, P.R. Shukla, A. Pirani, W. Moufouma-Okia, C. Péan, R. Pidcock, S. Connors, J.B.R. Matthews, Y. Chen, X. Zhou, M.I. Gomis, E. Lonnoy, T. Maycock, M. Tignor, and T. Waterfield (eds.)].</ref>) entail low to moderate levels of CDR (up to 1000 PgC removed; IPCC SR1.5 Chapter 2<ref>Rogelj, J., D. Shindell, K. Jiang, S. Fifita, P. Forster, V. Ginzburg, C. Handa, H. Kheshgi, S. Kobayashi, E. Kriegler, L. Mundaca, R. Séférian, and M.V. Vilariño, 2018: Mitigation Pathways Compatible with 1.5°C in the Context of Sustainable Development. In: Global Warming of 1.5°C. An IPCC Special Report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty [Masson-Delmotte, V., P. Zhai, H.-O. Pörtner, D. Roberts, J. Skea, P.R. Shukla, A. Pirani, W. Moufouma-Okia, C. Péan, R. Pidcock, S. Connors, J.B.R. Matthews, Y. Chen, X. Zhou, M.I. Gomis, E. Lonnoy, T. Maycock, M. Tignor, and T. Waterfield (eds.)].</ref>). NETs are also an underlying assumption of overshoot scenarios -where a given temperature target is temporarily exceeded and then returned to with the aid of negative emission. While global mean temperature has shown to be largely reversible in response to artifical carbon dioxide removal, other components of climate change (such as sea-level rise, ocean acidification, and other terrestrial and marine ecosystem changes) are not easily reversible on human time-scales, even if extremely large amounts of NETs were implemented<ref>{{Cite journal|last=Jones|first=C D|last2=Ciais|first2=P|last3=Davis|first3=S J|last4=Friedlingstein|first4=P|last5=Gasser|first5=T|last6=Peters|first6=G P|last7=Rogelj|first7=J|last8=van Vuuren|first8=D P|last9=Canadell|first9=J G|last10=Cowie|first10=A|last11=Jackson|first11=R B|date=2016-09-01|title=Simulating the Earth system response to negative emissions|url=https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/11/9/095012|journal=Environmental Research Letters|language=en|volume=11|issue=9|pages=095012|doi=10.1088/1748-9326/11/9/095012|issn=1748-9326}}</ref><ref>{{Cite journal|last=Tokarska|first=Katarzyna B|last2=Zickfeld|first2=Kirsten|date=2015-09-01|title=The effectiveness of net negative carbon dioxide emissions in reversing anthropogenic climate change|url=https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/10/9/094013|journal=Environmental Research Letters|language=en|volume=10|issue=9|pages=094013|doi=10.1088/1748-9326/10/9/094013|issn=1748-9326}}</ref><ref>{{Cite journal|last=Hofmann|first=M.|last2=Mathesius|first2=S.|last3=Kriegler|first3=E.|last4=Vuuren|first4=D. P. van|last5=Schellnhuber|first5=H. J.|date=2019-12-06|title=Strong time dependence of ocean acidification mitigation by atmospheric carbon dioxide removal|url=https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-13586-4|journal=Nature Communications|language=en|volume=10|issue=1|pages=5592|doi=10.1038/s41467-019-13586-4|issn=2041-1723}}</ref>.
[[File:NETs hr.jpg|alt=|thumb|Different groups of negative emission technologies<ref>{{Cite journal|last=Minx|first=Jan C|last2=Lamb|first2=William F|last3=Callaghan|first3=Max W|last4=Bornmann|first4=Lutz|last5=Fuss|first5=Sabine|date=2017-03-01|title=Fast growing research on negative emissions|url=https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ee5|journal=Environmental Research Letters|language=en|volume=12|issue=3|pages=035007|doi=10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ee5|issn=1748-9326}}</ref> (Source: Figure 1 from Jan C Minx ''et al'' 2017 ''Environ. Res. Lett.'' '''12''' 035007)]]
Different groups of negative emission technologies<ref>{{Cite journal|last=Minx|first=Jan C|last2=Lamb|first2=William F|last3=Callaghan|first3=Max W|last4=Bornmann|first4=Lutz|last5=Fuss|first5=Sabine|date=2017-03-01|title=Fast growing research on negative emissions|url=https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ee5|journal=Environmental Research Letters|volume=12|issue=3|pages=035007|doi=10.1088/1748-9326/aa5ee5|issn=1748-9326}}</ref>:
 
==Data==
[https://data.ene.iiasa.ac.at/iamc-1.5c-explorer/#/login?redirect=%2Fworkspaces '''IPCC SR1.5 Scenario Explorer''']- climate change migation pathways used in the IPCC SR1.5 report<ref name=":3" /> (many of the scenarios contain negative emissions).
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==References==